BOTOX onabotulinumtoxinA

Enlarge Share Print

Frequently asked questions about BOTOX®

Some of the most common questions about BOTOX® therapy are answered here. If you would like more information, talk to your doctor. If you have questions about BOTOX® for the treatment of the symptoms of severe underarm sweating when topical medicines do not work well enough, click here. Visit BOTOXCosmetic.com to get answers related to the temporary treatment of moderate to severe frown lines between the brows.

Click on a tab to view common questions about the "who, what, when, where, why, and how" of BOTOX®. Click on a specific question to view the answer.

What is the most important information I should know about BOTOX®?

BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic may cause serious side effects that can be life threatening. Call your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of these problems after treatment with BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic:

  • Problems swallowing, speaking, or breathing. These problems can happen hours to weeks after an injection of BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic usually because the muscles that you use to breathe and swallow can become weak after the injection. Death can happen as a complication if you have severe problems with swallowing or breathing after treatment with BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic
  • People with certain breathing problems may need to use muscles in their neck to help them breathe. These patients may be at greater risk for serious breathing problems with BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic
  • Swallowing problems may last for several months. People who cannot swallow well may need a feeding tube to receive food and water. If swallowing problems are severe, food or liquids may go into your lungs. People who already have swallowing or breathing problems before receiving BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic have the highest risk of getting these problems
  • Spread of toxin effects. In some cases, the effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas of the body away from the injection site and cause symptoms of a serious condition called botulism. The symptoms of botulism include:
    • loss of strength and muscle weakness all over the body
    • double vision
    • blurred vision and drooping eyelids
    • hoarseness or change or loss of voice (dysphonia)
    • trouble saying words clearly (dysarthria)
    • loss of bladder control
    • trouble breathing
    • trouble swallowing

These symptoms can happen hours to weeks after you receive an injection of BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic.

These problems could make it unsafe for you to drive a car or do other dangerous activities. See "What should I avoid while receiving BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic?"

There has not been a confirmed serious case of spread of toxin effect away from the injection site when BOTOX® has been used at the recommended dose to treat chronic migraine, severe underarm sweating, blepharospasm, or strabismus, or when BOTOX® Cosmetic has been used at the recommended dose to treat frown lines.

What is BOTOX® therapy?

BOTOX® is a prescription medicine that is injected into muscles and used:

  • To prevent headaches in adults with chronic migraine who have 15 or more days each month with headache lasting 4 or more hours each day
  • To treat increased muscle stiffness in elbow, wrist, and finger muscles in adults with upper limb spasticity
  • To treat the abnormal head position and neck pain that happens with cervical dystonia (CD) in adults
  • To treat certain types of eye muscle problems (strabismus) or abnormal spasm of the eyelids (blepharospasm) in people 12 years and older

BOTOX® is also injected into the skin to treat the symptoms of severe underarm sweating (severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis) when medicines used on the skin (topical) do not work well enough. For more information, visit BOTOXSevereSweating.com.

It is not known whether BOTOX® is safe or effective in patients younger than:

  • 18 years of age for treatment of chronic migraine
  • 18 years of age for treatment of spasticity
  • 16 years of age for treatment of cervical dystonia
  • 18 years of age for treatment of hyperhidrosis
  • 12 years of age for treatment of strabismus or blepharospasm

It is not known whether BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic are safe or effective to prevent headaches in patients with migraine who have 14 or fewer headache days each month (episodic migraine).

It is not known whether BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic are safe or effective for other types of muscle spasms or for severe sweating anywhere other than your armpits.

To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy, click here.

What should I avoid while taking BOTOX®?

BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic may cause loss of strength or general muscle weakness, or vision problems within hours to weeks of taking BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic. If this happens, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities. See "What is the most important information I should know about BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic?" in the Medication Guide.

What are the possible side effects of BOTOX® injections?

BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic can cause serious side effects. See "What is the most important information I should know about BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic?" in Medication Guide.

Other side effects of BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic include:

  • dry mouth
  • discomfort or pain at the injection site
  • tiredness
  • headache
  • neck pain
  • eye problems: double vision, blurred vision, decreased eyesight, drooping eyelids, swelling of your eyelids, and dry eyes
  • allergic reactions. Symptoms of an allergic reaction to BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic may include: itching, rash, red itchy welts, wheezing, asthma symptoms, or dizziness or feeling faint. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you are wheezing or have asthma symptoms, or if you become dizzy or faint

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is insurance coverage like for BOTOX® treatment?

Many insurance plans, including Medicaid and Medicare, cover the cost of BOTOX® treatments.
Call the BOTOX® Reimbursement Solutions Support Center for help resolving insurance coverage issues regarding BOTOX® treatment. Certain patients who are self-insured or insured through a commercial insurance plan may qualify for the BOTOX® Partnership for Access Program. This program can help insured patients manage their out-of-pocket costs for BOTOX® treatment. (Note: This program is not available for people with Medicare, Medicaid, or another government health program. It is also not available to residents of Massachusetts.) Click here to learn more about the BOTOX® Partnership for Access Program.

Also, the BOTOX PATIENT ASSISTANCE® Program may help provide access to BOTOX® to eligible patients who:

  • are uninsured or do not have full insurance
  • demonstrate a financial need
  • do not qualify for government assistance

For more information about BOTOX® Reimbursement Solutions or to find out if you are eligible
for the BOTOX PATIENT ASSISTANCE® Program, call:

1-800-44-BOTOX (1-800-442-6869)
Press Option 4 for BOTOX® Reimbursement Solutions.
Press Option 6 for BOTOX PATIENT ASSISTANCE® Program.

What if I do not have insurance or have insufficient insurance and cannot afford BOTOX®?

Allergan supports the BOTOX PATIENT ASSISTANCE® Program for financially eligible patients who do not have the resources to pay for their treatment.

To find out if you are eligible, call:

1-800-44-BOTOX (1-800-442-6869)
Press Option 4 for BOTOX® Reimbursement Solutions.
Press Option 6 for BOTOX PATIENT ASSISTANCE® Program.

Or you can learn more by visiting the BOTOX® Reimbursement Solutions website.

What is cervical dystonia?

Cervical dystonia is a condition that affects muscles in the neck. If you have cervical dystonia, those muscles may tighten or spasm without your control. This can force your head and neck into movements or positions that are painful and awkward.

If you think your symptoms may be caused by cervical dystonia, talk to your doctor. To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy for cervical dystonia, click here.

To learn how BOTOX® therapy can help relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia, click here.

What is blepharospasm?

Blepharospasm causes muscle spasms in and around the eyelids. This results in frequent blinking and closing of the eyes that you can’t control. Because of these symptoms, it can be hard to see. Treatment with BOTOX® can help reduce muscle spasms. This can reduce blinking, which may help improve your ability to see. If you think your symptoms may be caused by blepharospasm, talk to your doctor. To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy for blepharospasm, click here.

What is strabismus?

Strabismus is also called crossed eyes. Crossed eyes happen when certain muscles tighten around the eye. This tightening pulls the eyeball to the side. BOTOX® treatment can reduce muscle spasms in the affected muscles. Then the eyeball can return to its normal position. If you think your symptoms may be caused by strabismus, talk to your doctor. To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy for strabismus, click here.

What is upper limb spasticity?

Spasticity is a medical condition that may cause certain muscles in your body to become stiff or tight. This stiffness in the muscles of the elbow, wrist, or fingers could be a condition called upper limb spasticity. Upper limb spasticity may occur after a stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, or in people with multiple sclerosis or adult cerebral palsy.

Here are common postures of upper limb spasticity:

Click image to enlarge
 
Bent wrist
Wrist is bent with the
fingers pointing down and
back toward the forearm.
Closed fist
Fingers are tightly clasped
into the palm of the hand.
Flexed elbow
Elbow is bent with the hand
at the shoulder.

To learn more about upper limb spasticity, download the patient brochure.

The effectiveness of BOTOX® for treating upper limb spasticity has been evaluated in clinical studies in patients experiencing upper limb spasticity after a stroke. These studies showed that BOTOX® reduced muscle tone, or helped ease muscle stiffness, in the elbow, wrist, and fingers.1

To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy for upper limb spasticity, click here.

What is Chronic Migraine?

Chronic Migraine is defined as 15 or more headache days each month with headache lasting 4 or more hours each day.1 Chronic Migraine is different than the typical "episodic" migraine by how often headaches occur. (Episodic migraine is defined as 14 or fewer headache days each month1).

It is estimated that Chronic Migraine affects approximately 3.2 million* Americans,2 and can leave sufferers in pain for at least half of every month. All migraines share some basic features, although each person will experience a migraine headache in his or her own unique way. Generally, all migraines begin as a dull ache and then develop into a constant, throbbing pain felt at the temples, as well as the front of the head, back of the head, or 1 side of the head. The pain typically includes nausea and/or vomiting, and sensitivity to light and noise. Some people—but not all—also see auras (flashing lights or colored, wavy, or jagged lines).3,4

BOTOX® is the first medicine to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) specifically for the prevention of headaches in adults with Chronic Migraine who have 15 or more headache days each month with headache lasting 4 or more hours each day in people 18 years or older.

Patients treated with BOTOX® averaged 8 to 9 fewer headache days per month compared with baseline (vs 6 to 7 days with placebo).1,5,6

If you think you may have Chronic Migraine, talk to your doctor. To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy for Chronic Migraine, click here.

*Estimate determined by taking the publication's Chronic Migraine prevalence rate and applying it to 2010 US population estimates for those 18 or more years of age (n = 234,504,070).2,7

Who should not take BOTOX®?

Do not take BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic if you:

  • are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic. See the end of the Medication Guide for a list of ingredients in BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic
  • had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin®
  • have a skin infection at the planned injection site

To prepare for a discussion with your doctor about BOTOX® therapy, click here.

When will BOTOX® start to work?

Depending on your condition, you may begin seeing an improvement in your symptoms within a few days of BOTOX® treatment, but the full effect usually takes longer. Your doctor will help you determine what to expect for your condition. Because symptoms can change over time, the amount and duration of relief you feel may vary.

Where can I find a doctor who injects BOTOX®?

You may use the Find a BOTOX ® Specialist tool on this website to find a doctor who provides BOTOX® treatment near you. They can help provide answers to your questions about BOTOX®.

BOTOX® therapy is given by injection. Only a licensed healthcare professional can inject BOTOX®.

Why does my doctor give me a BOTOX® Medication Guide each time I receive BOTOX® injections?

A Medication Guide is one of the specific safety practices required by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for certain types of drugs or biologics that present an important benefit to patients but may carry serious risks if not used properly. The BOTOX® Medication Guide helps to ensure that you receive important safety information about your therapy. It is important that you receive from your doctor and review the BOTOX® Medication Guide at every injection, even if you've reviewed it before, because information might be updated.

How are BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic different?

While BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic are used for different purposes, the formulation is the same. The same formulation with dosing specific to moderate to severe frown lines between the eyebrows (glabellar lines) in people 18 to 65 years of age was approved by the FDA in 2002 as BOTOX® Cosmetic. For more information about BOTOX® Cosmetic, please click here.

How does BOTOX® neurotoxin work?

The signals that cause muscle spasms are sent to the muscles through the nerves. BOTOX® blocks the signals that cause muscle spasms in the injected muscles. To learn how BOTOX® helps relieve neck muscle spasms and neck pain related to cervical dystonia, click here. To learn how BOTOX® helps relieve eye muscle problems or abnormal spasm of the eyelids, click here.

How is BOTOX® given?

BOTOX® therapy is given by injection. You can get BOTOX® treatment right in your doctor's office. How much BOTOX® the doctor injects and which muscles are injected may be different from person to person. You should be able to leave your doctor's office later the same day.

How often can I be treated with BOTOX® injections?

Your doctor will decide how often you can be treated with BOTOX®. You may receive repeat injections as long as:

  • your condition responds to BOTOX® therapy
  • you do not have any serious allergic reactions to BOTOX® or other significant side effects

How can I help maintain my response to BOTOX®?

To maintain the best possible response to BOTOX® treatment over time, your doctor will give you the lowest effective dose. Also, he or she will determine the proper time between injections. To help your doctor determine how to best manage your treatment, you may wish to track your symptoms in a diary.

BOTOX OnTrack™ Patient Program features resources and support such as appointment reminders, personal reports, and an interactive learning center. Click here to learn more.

How painful is the BOTOX® injection?

The needles used to give a BOTOX® injection are very fine so most people experience only mild discomfort.

How long do the effects of BOTOX® therapy last?

After receiving BOTOX® treatment, relief may last for up to 3 months.1 You may be able to receive additional BOTOX® treatment as needed. Your doctor will decide if repeat injections can help you. You may receive repeat injections as long as:

  • your condition responds to BOTOX® therapy
  • you do not have any serious allergic reactions to BOTOX® or other significant side effects

Please see Important Safety Information, including Boxed Warning, below

Read

BOTOX® Partnership for Access

 

GO

BOTOX® (onabotulinumtoxinA) & BOTOX ® Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA) Important Information

Indications
BOTOX® is a prescription medicine that is injected into muscles and used:

  • to treat overactive bladder symptoms such as a strong need to urinate with leaking or wetting accidents (urge urinary incontinence), a strong need to urinate right away (urgency), and urinating often (frequency) in adults 18 years and older when another type of medicine (anticholinergic) does not work well enough or cannot be taken.
  • to treat leakage of urine (incontinence) in adults 18 years and older with overactive bladder due to neurologic disease who still have leakage or connot tolerate the side effects after trying an anticholinergic medication
  • to prevent headaches in adults with chronic migraine who have 15 or more days each month with headache lasting 4 or more hours each day in people 18 years or older
  • to treat increased muscle stiffness in elbow, wrist, and finger muscles in people 18 years and older with upper limb spasticity
  • to treat the abnormal head position and neck pain that happens with cervical dystonia (CD) in people 16 years and older
  • to treat certain types of eye muscle problems (strabismus) or abnormal spasm of the eyelids (blepharospasm) in people 12 years and older

BOTOX® is also injected into the skin to treat the symptoms of severe underarm sweating (severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis) when medicines used on the skin (topical) do not work well enough in people 18 years and older.

BOTOX® Cosmetic is a prescription medicine that is injected into muscles and used to improve the look of moderate to severe frown lines between the eyebrows (glabellar lines) in adults younger than 65 years of age for a short period of time (temporary).

It is not known whether BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic is safe or effective to prevent headaches in patients with migraine who have 14 or fewer headache days each month (episodic migraine).

It is not known whether BOTOX® is safe or effective to treat increased stiffness in upper-limb muscles other than those in the elbow, wrist, and fingers, or to treat increased stiffness in lower-limb muscles. BOTOX® has not been shown to help people perform task-specific functions with their upper limbs or increase movement in joints that are permanently fixed in position by stiff muscles. Treatment with BOTOX® is not meant to replace your existing physical therapy or other rehabilitation that your doctor may have prescribed.

It is not known whether BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic are safe or effective for severe sweating anywhere other than your armpits.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic may cause serious side effects that can be life threatening. Call your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of these problems any time (hours to weeks) after injection of BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic:

  • Problems swallowing, speaking, or breathing, due to weakening of associated muscles, can be severe and result in loss of life. You are at the highest risk if these problems are pre-existing before injection. Swallowing problems may last for several months
  • Spread of toxin effects. The effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas away from the injection site and cause serious symptoms including: loss of strength and all-over muscle weakness, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids, hoarseness or change or loss of voice (dysphonia), trouble saying words clearly (dysarthria), loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing. If this happens, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities

There has not been a confirmed serious case of spread of toxin effect away from the injection site when BOTOX® has been used at the recommended dose to treat chronic migraine, severe underarm sweating, blepharospasm, strabismus, or when BOTOX® Cosmetic has been used at the recommended dose to treat frown lines.

Do not take BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.

Do not take BOTOX® for the treatment of urinary incontinence if you: have a urinary tract infection (UTI) or cannot empty your bladder on your own and are not routinely catheterizing.

Due to the risk of urinary retention (not being able to empty the bladder), only patients who are willing and able to initiate catheterization post-treatment, if required, should be considered for treatment.

Patients treated for overactive bladder
In clinical trials, 6.5% of patients (36/552) initiated clean intermittent catheterization for urinary retention following treatment with BOTOX® 100 Units as compared to 0.4% of patients (2/542) treated with placebo.  The median duration of catheterization for these patients treated with BOTOX® 100 Units  was 63 days (minimum 1 day to maximum 214 days) as compared to a median duration 11 days (minimum 3 days to maximum 18 days) for patients receiving placebo.

Patients with diabetes mellitus treated with BOTOX® were more likely to develop urinary retention than non-diabetics.

Patients treated for overactive bladder due to neurologic disease
In clinical trials, 30.6% of patients (33/108) who were not using clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) prior to injection, required catheterization for urinary retention following treatment with BOTOX® 200 Units as compared to 6.7% of patients (7/104) treated with placebo.  The median duration of post-injection catheterization for these patients treated with BOTOX® 200 Units (n=33) was 289 days (minimum 1 day to maximum 530 days) as compared to a median duration 358 days (minimum 2 days to maximum 379 days) for patients receiving placebo (n=7).

Among patients not using CIC at baseline, those with MS were more likely to require CIC post-injection than those with SCI.

The dose of BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic is not the same as, or comparable to, another botulinum toxin product.

Serious and/or immediate allergic reactions have been reported. These reactions include itching, rash, red itchy welts, wheezing, asthma symptoms, or dizziness or feeling faint. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you experience any such symptoms; further injection of BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic should be discontinued.

Tell your doctor about all your muscle or nerve conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease), myasthenia gravis, or Lambert-Eaton syndrome, as you may be at increased risk of serious side effects including severe dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) and respiratory compromise (difficulty breathing) from typical doses of BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic.

Tell your doctor if you have any breathing-related problems. Your doctor will want to monitor you for any breathing problems during your treatment with BOTOX® for upper limb spasticity or for detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition.  The risk of pulmonary effects in patients with compromised respiratory status is increased in patients receiving BOTOX®.

Cornea problems have been reported. Cornea (surface of the eye) problems have been reported in some people receiving BOTOX® for their blepharospasm, especially in people with certain nerve disorders. BOTOX® may cause the eyelids to blink less, which could lead to the surface of the eye being exposed to air more than is usual. Tell your doctor if you experience any problems with your eyes while receiving BOTOX®. Your doctor may treat your eyes with drops, ointments, contact lenses, or with an eye patch.

Bleeding behind the eye has been reported. Bleeding behind the eyeball has been reported in some people receiving BOTOX® for their strabismus. Tell your doctor if you notice any new visual problems while receiving BOTOX®

Bronchitis and upper respiratory tract infections (common colds) have been reported. Bronchitis was reported more frequently in people receiving BOTOX® for their upper limb spasticity. Upper respiratory infections (common colds) were also reported more frequently in people with prior breathing-related problems.

Autonomic dysreflexia in patients treated for overactive bladder due to neurologic disease
Autonomic dysreflexia associated with intradetrusor injections of BOTOX® could occur in patients treated for detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition and may require prompt medical therapy.  In clinical trials, the incidence of autonomic dysreflexia was greater in patients treated with BOTOX® 200 Units compared with placebo (1.5% versus 0.4%, respectively).

Human albumin and spread of viral diseases. BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic contains albumin, a protein component of human blood. The potential risk of spreading viral diseases (eg, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease [CJD]) via human serum albumin is extremely rare. No cases of viral diseases or CJD have ever been reported in association with human serum albumin.

Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you: have or have had bleeding problems; have plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; weakness of forehead muscles, such as trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; have symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI) and are being treated for urinary incontinence. Symptoms of a urinary tract infection may include pain or burning with urination, frequent urination, or fever; have problems emptying your bladder on your own and are being treated for urinary incontinence; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed (it is not known if BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Using BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic with certain other medicines may cause serious side effects. Do not start any new medicines until you have told your doctor that you have received BOTOX® or BOTOX® Cosmetic in the past.

Especially tell your doctor if you: have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (be sure your doctor knows exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take anti-platelets (aspirin-like products) or anti-coagulants (blood thinners).

Other side effects of BOTOX® and BOTOX® Cosmetic include: dry mouth, discomfort or pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, neck pain, and eye problems: double vision, blurred vision, decreased eyesight, drooping eyelids, swelling of your eyelids, and dry eyes; In people being treated for urinary incontinence other side effects include: urinary tract infection, painful urination, and/or inability to empty your bladder on your own. If you have difficulty fully emptying your bladder after receiving BOTOX®, you may need to use disposable self-catheters to empty your bladder up to a few times each day until your bladder is able to start emptying again.

For more information refer to the Medication Guide or talk with your doctor.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see BOTOX® full Product Information including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide.

Please see BOTOX® Cosmetic full Product Information including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide.

® marks owned by Allergan, Inc.   APC01CK13

Dysport is a registered trademark of Ipsen Biopharm Limited.
Myobloc is a registered trademark of Solstice Neurosciences, Inc.
Xeomin is a registered trademark of Merz Pharma GmbH & Co. KGaA.

© ALLERGAN  |  Site Map  |  Privacy and Terms  |  Contact Us

This site is intended for US consumers only. No information on this site is provided with the intention to give medical advice or instructions on the accurate use of Allergan products. Allergan cannot answer unsolicited emails requesting personal medical advice; visitors should always consult a healthcare professional. Please visit the Allergan site of your country of residence for information concerning Allergan products and services available there.